The Queen only agreed to the 007 Olympics stunt if none of her family members were told

On Her Majesty’s Top Secret Service: Queen only agreed to 007 Olympics stunt if none of her family were told

Like any secret agent, James Bond plays his cards close to his chest, so he was a key ally when the Queen wanted to keep his famous appearance at the opening ceremony of the London 2012 Olympics a secret.

Her Majesty agreed to appear opposite 007 actor Daniel Craig only on the condition that it completely surprise the rest of the Royal Family.

For this same reason, even David Cameron’s cabinet was sidelined.

Her Majesty agreed to appear opposite 007 actor Daniel Craig only on the condition that it completely surprise the rest of the Royal Family.

Her Majesty agreed to appear opposite 007 actor Daniel Craig only on the condition that it completely surprise the rest of the Royal Family.

Details of the strict secret are revealed in today’s edition of BBC Radio 4’s Reunion programme, which marks the tenth anniversary of the Games.

Sam Hunter, the ceremony’s production manager, told the programme: ‘The Queen never told her family she was doing it. That was one of the stipulations, that she agreed to be a part of it… So if you actually see when she comes and takes her seat, you can see her family say, ‘Ah, nice.’ ‘

The skit – watched by a global TV audience of more than a billion people – aired just before the Queen’s actual entrance into the Olympic Stadium.

Viewers saw Craig’s 007 arrive at Buckingham Palace in a taxi and the Queen greeted him with the words: “Good evening, Mr Bond.”

The skit ¿ watched by a global TV audience of over a billion ¿ aired just before the Queen's actual entrance into the Olympic Stadium

The skit – watched by a global TV audience of more than a billion people – aired just before the Queen’s actual entrance into the Olympic Stadium.

The final live action sequence involved two stuntmen dressed as Her Majesty and Bond parachuting into the stadium from a helicopter. A few minutes later, the real queen arrived in the royal box in the same outfit as the paratrooper.

Executive producer Stephen Daldry, who was briefing the government on the ceremony, said: “What was difficult was that you didn’t really want to say much to Cabinet because you didn’t know how upset they were. security.”

Mr Daldry also remembers having to slap Muhammad Ali – who was nearly unconscious from medication he had taken for his Parkinson’s disease – so that he could take his place on stage.

The meeting is on BBC Radio 4 today at 11am and will be repeated on Friday at 9am.

Advertisement

Leave a Comment